The Department of Communication and Culture and University of Calgary Film Society Present

current screening

To Be a Miss (2016)

When and Where: 

Wednesday, February 22nd at 7:00pm

at The Gallery Hall (across from the Nickle Galleries) in Taylor Family Digital Library


About the Film:

Blessed with breathtaking landscapes and abundant natural resources, the South American country of Venezuela has also become renowned in recent years as the home to uniquely beautiful women celebrated in international beauty pageants. Indeed, Venezuela has claimed title to more global beauty competitions than any other nation in the world, successfully taking 6 Miss Universe, 6 Miss World, and 5 Miss International crowns.

The success of Venezuela’s pageant stars on the world stage has instilled an immense sense of national pride, while spawning an all-consuming obsession with physical appearance, and a desire by millions of Venezuelan girls to be a Miss.

Yet behind the glamor and fame that accompanies the pageants, there lies a more sobering portrait of what it means to be a woman in this Caribbean nation.

While millions of dollars are pumped every year into countless local and regional beauty contests and the powerful media interests that drive the industry forward invest massive resources in instilling the image of Miss Venezuela in the minds of young girls, essential services for women in the country are severely lacking, domestic violence is rampant, teen pregnancy is staggering, and deaths resulting from botched cosmetic surgeries are commonplace.

To be a Miss is a feature-length documentary journey that takes the viewer through the inner workings of Venezuela’s beauty factory, exploring the hopes and dreams of young models as they strive to become the next Miss Venezuela. Following three central protagonists, the film exposes the risks and rewards associated with this multi-billion dollar industry while showing how nationalism, personal ambition, and the influence of mass media have transformed the lives of ordinary women in the country.

“The Venezuelan people’s first experience with democracy came about through a beauty contest. In this Latin American country, which was still a dictatorship in the 1950s, it was a novelty for a working-class beauty queen to beat a rival from the elite. Now, beauty contests are big business in Venezuela. To Be a Miss showcases the coaches, agencies, plastic surgeons and even a manufacturer of the hotly contested beauty queens’ crowns. But above all we see the young women trying to escape the poverty of everyday life by competing in beauty contests. In a small room shared by two sisters and a cousin, a Barbie doll hangs like a trophy on the wall. This is the sisters’ goal: to achieve the Barbie look. They go to the gym twice a day, eat far too little and take part in countless competitions. The success of Venezuelan women in international beauty pageants encourages them to hope for a better future. Nevertheless, there are also critical voices from the university – not surprising when we see the preliminary rounds of a contest being held in a plastic surgery practice.” – International Documentary Film Festival Amsterdam

A film by  film by Edward Ellis, Aaron Woolf and Flor Salcedo.
Executive Producers Catherine Murphy, Richard Lipsitz, and Andrea Clark.

30 minutes of Q&A to follow the screening.

All seating is first come, first served. Please arrive early.

Free for students with ID and community by donation ($5.00 – $10.00 suggested)

All proceeds go towards the Campus Food Bank.

Updated: January 31, 2017 — 1:22 am

Everyday Rebellion

everydayrebellion

Everyday Rebellion (2013)

WHEN & WHERE: 

Wednesday, October 29th at 7:00pm

at The Gallery Hall (across from the Nickle Galleries) in Taylor Family Digital Library

EVRE_Kino_Jordanien_Still 24

ABOUT THE FILM:

Everyday Rebellion is a cross-media documentary about creative forms of nonviolent protest and civil disobedience worldwide.

What does the Occupy movement in New York have in common with the Spanish Indignados protests or the Arab Spring? Is there a connection between the struggle of the Iranian democracy movement and the nonviolent uprising in Syria and what is the link between the Ukrainian topless activists of Femen and an Islamic culture like Egypt? And to top it off, what do Serbia and Turkey have to do with all this?

The reasons for the various people’s uprisings in these countries may be diverse, but the creative nonviolent tactics they use in their struggles are strongly connected to each other. So are the activists who share these strategies, new ideas and established methods. Everyday Rebellion is a story about the richness of peaceful protest, acted out everyday by passionate people from Spain, Iran, Syria, Ukraine, USA, UK and Serbia. These methods are inventive, funny and sometimes even aggressive. And the activists who use them believe that creative nonviolent protest will win over violent protest – and they are right. Nonviolence has scientifically been proven to be more effective and successful than violent protest. And the users of nonviolence are feared because they are rapidly changing the world and challenging dictatorships as well as global corporations.

Everyday Rebellion is a tribute to the creativity of the nonviolent resistance. The project studies the consequences of a modern and rapidly changing society where new forms of protest to challenge the power of dictatorships and sometimes also global corporations are invented everyday. Everyday Rebellion wants to give voice to all those who decide not to use violence to try changing a violent system. Because, as Ghandi said: “First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win.”

– See more at: http://www.everydayrebellion.net/

Directed by The Riahi Brothers

Everyday Rebellion 2

AWARDS:

• CPH:DOX 2013 – Politikens Audience Award

• CINEMA FOR PEACE 2014 – Most Valuable Documentary Nominee

• SXSW 2014 – Interactive Awards Finalist

30 minute discussion to follow screening (TBA)

All seating is first come, first served. Please arrive early.

Free for students with ID and community by donation ($5.00 – $10.00 suggested)

All proceeds go towards the Campus Food Bank.

Updated: October 6, 2014 — 4:12 am

No Fire Zone: The Killing Fields of Sri Lanka

No Fire Zone

No Fire Zone (2013)

WHEN & WHERE: 

Wednesday, September 24th at 7:00pm

at The Gallery Hall (across from the Nickle Galleries) in Taylor Family Digital Library

 

ABOUT THE FILM:

No Fire Zone tells the story of the final months of the 26-year long Sri Lankan civil war. The story is told by the people who lived through it – and through some of the most dramatic and disturbing video evidence ever seen.This footage was recorded by both the victims and perpetrators on mobile phones and small cameras during the final 138 days of hell which form the central narrative of the film.

Directed by Callum Macrae

No Fire Zone Publicity Still

AWARDS:

• Nuremberg Film Festival Audience Award

• Brussels Festival de Liberte FIDH Human Rights Award

• Jury Special Mentions: CPH:DOX (Copenhagen) and Film South Asia (Nepal)

Please join Movies That Matter for our premiere film screening of the 2014-2015 season.

30 minute discussion to follow screening (TBA)

All seating is first come, first served. Please arrive early.

Free for students with ID and community by donation ($5.00 – $10.00 suggested)

All proceeds go towards the Campus Food Bank.

Updated: September 18, 2014 — 7:26 pm

Purgatorio: A Journey into the Heart of the Border

Purgatorio (2013), A film by Rodrigo Reyes

WHEN

Wednesday, February 26th at 7:00pm

at The Gallery Hall (across from the Nickle Galleries) in Taylor Family Digital Library

ABOUT THE FILM

Following in the poetic tradition of Terence Malick, Ron Fricke and Werner Herzog, Purgatorio is a beautiful, elegant portrait of the US Mexican border and the lives of those who live in its shadow. At some moments cynical, others hopeful, the film offers us a difficult, direct and often brutal vision of the border, which is ultimately framed as a testament to human division, separation and indifference towards each other. Rather than taking a “Voice of God” or a talking head approach, director Rodrigo Reyes limits his voice-over to offering poetic contexts to the images, and rather than speaking for the subjects he allows them to speak for themselves, with all their faults and complexities. So although the images are often disturbing, they work in a holistically way, as an interrogation and exploration of human separation.

Directed by Rodrigo Reyes
Produced by Inti Cordera
Executive Producer: Hugo Perez
Cinematography by Justin Chin
A co-production of RR CINEMA, LA MAROMA PRODUCTIONS and FOPROCINE
Purgatorio-LA-FF-VIMEO
PRESS

“A searing, horrifying, at times starkly beautiful documentary ode to the netherworlds surrounding the U.S.-Mexico barrier” – Andrew Barker, VARIETY

“An elegiac and cinematically shot poem filled with emotional narration and iconography” – Christine Davila, IndieWIRE

“Beautifully photographed, exquisitely crafted film with poetic overtones and a wide sweeping vision” – Alan Berliner, Documentary Filmmaker

AWARDS

Jury Award for Best Documentary, NEW ORLEANS FILM FESTIVAL

Jury Award for Best Documentary, THIS HUMAN WORLD

• 25 New Faces of Independent Film, FILMMAKER MAGAZINE

TRIVIA

Purgatorio was shot with a film crew of three over the course of 4 weeks in Mexico during Fall 2011

• The idea for the film was seeded in 2009 during Reyes’ harsh encounter with the realities of the Mexico/US border while filming in Mexico for the experimental documentary Memories of the Future

• The film maker spent 2 years as a Spanish interpreter in an emergency room and a state court to fund Purgatorio

30 minute discussion to follow screening (TBA)

All seating is first come, first served. Please arrive early.

Free for students with ID and community by donation ($5.00 – $10.00 suggested)

All proceeds go towards the Campus Food Bank.

Updated: February 18, 2014 — 3:29 am

PAD YATRA: A Green Oddyssey

Wednesday, March 27 – 7:00 PM

Gallery Hall in the Taylor Family Digital Library at the University of Calgary

ABOUT THE FILM

Pad Yatra: A Green Oddyssey is presented as part of NUTV’s environmentally-themed Greenlite Arts Festival. Shot with solar power by Ladakhi monk Ngawang Sodpa, the film features United Nations MDG Honoree H.H. the Gyalwang Drukpa and supporter Aamir Khan. The film is executive produced by Michelle Yeoh, narrated by Daryl Hannah, and it is the debut feature project of writer/director Wendy J.N. Lee.

This film’s story opens in Ladakh, India (“Little Tibet”), during the aftermath of a freak weather phenomenon known as a cloudburst. Several inches of rain fall in the first sixty seconds, decimating the area with an apocalyptic cascade of mudslides and flash floods. As incidences like this increase over time, entire cultures are now under threat of dispersion, not by the hand of genocide or war, but by the climate chaos associated with global warming.

A cry for survival, the “eco-Pad Yatra” seen in the film was a trek of unparalleled  danger, designed to spread the modern message of  environmental compassion by human’s most basic means –by walking, village to village, and showing by example. Collecting trash and plastic from water sources, the trekkers educated remote villages on reusing non-biodegradable materials, planting trees, and how to live responsibly as their traditional lives are now changing.

Surviving harrowing injuries, illness, and starvation, the 700 trekkers emerge with nearly half a ton of plastic litter strapped to their backs, triggering an historic green revolution across the rooftop of the world.

30 MINUTE DISCUSSION TO FOLLOW SCREENING with writer/director of the film Wendy J.N. Lee.

All seating is first come, first served. Please arrive early.

Free for students with ID and community by donation ($5.00 – $10.00 suggested)

All proceeds go towards the Campus Food Bank.

Updated: March 5, 2013 — 2:18 pm

TASTE THE WASTE

TASTE THE WASTE

Wednesday, February 29 – 6:30 PM

That Empty Space, MacEwan Student Centre

AMAZING BUT TRUE: On the way from the farm to the dining-room table, more than half the food lands on the dump. Most of it before it ever reaches consumers. For instance every other head of lettuce or potato.
Agriculture is responsible for more than a third of the greenhouse gases worldwide because farming requires energy, fertilizers and land. What’s more, whenever food rots away at a garbage dump, methane escapes into the atmosphere, a climate gas with an effect 25 times as powerful as carbon dioxide. In other words, when we waste half of our food it has a disastrous impact on the world climate.

Attendance is free for students Free to U of C students (with valid U of C I.D.). Non U of C students: suggested cash ($5 to $10) or food donation to the Campus Food Bank. The food bank prefers donations of meal helpers (Sidekicks/Uncle Ben’s rice), canned pasta/chili, Kraft Dinner, peanut butter, dry pasta, canned veggies and/or beans, canned salmon/tuna, dry soup (Mr. Noodle/Ichiban), cereal, or pasta and tomato sauce.
Please note that the SU Campus Food Bank CANNOT accept Expired Food.

A SPECIAL SCREENING IN PARTNERSHIP WITH TRI-MEDIA AND THE STUDENTS’ UNION FOOD BANK

Written and Directed by Valentin Thurn – 2011 – 1 hour, 28 minutes

TASTE THE WASTE Official Website 

 

Updated: January 27, 2012 — 3:07 pm

MY PERESTROIKA

MY PERESTROIKA

Wednesday, October 26 – 6:00 PM

That Empty Space, MacEwan Student Centre

Five ordinary Russians living in extraordinary times

MY PERESTROIKA follows five ordinary Russians living in extraordinary times — from their sheltered Soviet childhood, to the collapse of the Soviet Union during their teenage years, to the constantly shifting political landscape of post-Soviet Russia. Together, these childhood classmates paint a complex picture of the dreams and disillusionment of those raised behind the Iron Curtain.

Attendance is free for students and $10 for non-students. Non-students can also bring a donation for the SU Campus Food Bank instead of paying for admission. The food bank prefers donations of meal helpers (Sidekicks/Uncle Ben’s rice), canned pasta/chili, Kraft Dinner, peanut butter, dry pasta, canned veggies and/or beans, canned salmon/tuna, dry soup (Mr. Noodle/Ichiban), cereal, or pasta and tomato sauce.
Please note that the SU Campus Food Bank CANNOT accept Expired Food.

Directed by Robin Hessman | 2011 | 87 mins.

MY PRESTROIKA Official Website 

Updated: October 7, 2011 — 2:25 pm
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