The Department of Communication, Media and Film and the University of Calgary Film Society Present

GRANITO

GRANITO

Wednesday, November 30 – 6:00 PM

That Empty Space, MacEwan Student Centre

HOW TO NAIL A DICTATOR

GRANITO is a story of destinies joined by Guatemala’s past, and how a documentary film intertwined with a nation’s turbulent history emerges as an active player in the present. In GRANITO our characters sift for clues buried in archives of mind and place and historical memory, seeking to uncover a narrative that could unlock the past and settle matters of life and death in the present. Each of the five main characters whose destinies collide in GRANITO are connected by the Guatemala of 1982, then engulfed in a war where a genocidal “scorched earth” campaign by the military exterminated nearly 200,000 Maya people. Now, as if a watchful Maya god were weaving back together threads of a story unraveled by the passage of time, forgotten by most, our characters become integral to the overarching narrative of wrongs done and justice sought that they have pieced together, each adding their granito, their tiny grain of sand, to the epic tale.

Attendance is free for students Free to U of C students (with valid U of C I.D.). Non U of C students: suggested cash ($5 to $10) or food donation to the Campus Food Bank. The food bank prefers donations of meal helpers (Sidekicks/Uncle Ben’s rice), canned pasta/chili, Kraft Dinner, peanut butter, dry pasta, canned veggies and/or beans, canned salmon/tuna, dry soup (Mr. Noodle/Ichiban), cereal, or pasta and tomato sauce.
Please note that the SU Campus Food Bank CANNOT accept Expired Food.

Directed by Pamela Yates | 2011 | 103 mins.

GRANITO Official Website 

Updated: October 27, 2011 — 1:38 pm

MY PERESTROIKA

MY PERESTROIKA

Wednesday, October 26 – 6:00 PM

That Empty Space, MacEwan Student Centre

Five ordinary Russians living in extraordinary times

MY PERESTROIKA follows five ordinary Russians living in extraordinary times — from their sheltered Soviet childhood, to the collapse of the Soviet Union during their teenage years, to the constantly shifting political landscape of post-Soviet Russia. Together, these childhood classmates paint a complex picture of the dreams and disillusionment of those raised behind the Iron Curtain.

Attendance is free for students and $10 for non-students. Non-students can also bring a donation for the SU Campus Food Bank instead of paying for admission. The food bank prefers donations of meal helpers (Sidekicks/Uncle Ben’s rice), canned pasta/chili, Kraft Dinner, peanut butter, dry pasta, canned veggies and/or beans, canned salmon/tuna, dry soup (Mr. Noodle/Ichiban), cereal, or pasta and tomato sauce.
Please note that the SU Campus Food Bank CANNOT accept Expired Food.

Directed by Robin Hessman | 2011 | 87 mins.

MY PRESTROIKA Official Website 

Updated: October 7, 2011 — 2:25 pm

HOW TO DIE IN OREGON

HOW TO DIE IN OREGON

Wednesday, September 28 – 6:00 PM

That Empty Space, MacEwan Student Centre

An intimate documentary exploring Oregon’s controversial Death with Dignity Act

In 1994, Oregon became the first state to legalize physician-assisted suicide. As a result, any individual whom two physicians diagnose as having less than six months to live can lawfully request a fatal dose of barbiturate to end his or her life. Since 1994, more than 500 Oregonians have taken their mortality into their own hands.

In How to Die in Oregon, filmmaker Peter Richardson gently enters the lives of the terminally ill as they consider whether — and when — to end their lives by lethal overdose. Richardson examines both sides of this complex, emotionally charged issue. What emerges is a life-affirming, staggeringly powerful portrait of what it means to die with dignity.

Attendance is free for students and $10 for non-students. Non-students can also bring a donation for the SU Campus Food Bank instead of paying for admission. The food bank prefers donations of meal helpers (Sidekicks/Uncle Ben’s rice), canned pasta/chili, Kraft Dinner, peanut butter, dry pasta, canned veggies and/or beans, canned salmon/tuna, dry soup (Mr. Noodle/Ichiban), cereal, or pasta and tomato sauce.
Please note that the SU Campus Food Bank CANNOT accept Expired Food.

Directed by Peter Richardson | 2011

HOW TO DIE IN OREGONofficial website

Updated: August 10, 2011 — 11:06 am

THERE ONCE WAS AN ISLAND

THERE ONCE WAS AN ISLAND

Wednesday, March 30 – 7:30 PM

That Empty Space, MacEwan Student Centre

What if your community had to decide whether to leave their homeland forever and there was no help available?

This is the reality for the culturally unique Polynesian community of Takuu, a tiny low-lying atoll in the South Western Pacific. As a terrifying tidal flood rips through their already damaged home, the Takuu community experiences the devastating effects of climate change first hand.

In this verite-style film, three intrepid characters Teloo, Endar and Satty, allow us into their lives and their culture and show us first hand the human impact of an environmental crisis. Two scientists, oceanographer John Hunter and geomorphologist Scott Smithers, investigate the situation with our characters and consider the impact of climate change on communities without access to resources or support. Intimate observational scenes allow Teloo, Endar and Satty to take us on their personal journeys as they consider whether to move to an uncertain future in Bougainville or to stay on Takuu and fight for a different, but equally uncertain, outcome.

This film gives a human face to the direct impacts of climate change in the Pacific, challenging audiences everywhere to consider their own relationship to the earth and the other people on it.

Attendance is free for students and $10 for non-students. Non-students can also bring a donation for the SU Campus Food Bank instead of paying for admission. The food bank prefers donations of meal helpers (Sidekicks/Uncle Ben’s rice), canned pasta/chili, Kraft Dinner, peanut butter, dry pasta, canned veggies and/or beans, canned salmon/tuna, dry soup (Mr. Noodle/Ichiban), cereal, or pasta and tomato sauce.
Please note that the SU Campus Food Bank CANNOT accept Expired Food.

Directed by Briar March | 1 hour 20 mins | 2010

THERE ONCE WAS AN ISLANDofficial website

Updated: March 1, 2011 — 2:33 pm

Wednesday, February 23: INTO ETERNITY

INTO ETERNITY
Wednesday, February 23 – 6:00 PM
That Empty Space, MacEwan Student Centre

Every day, the world over, large amounts of high-level radioactive waste created by nuclear power plants is placed in interim storage, which is vulnerable to natural disasters, man-made disasters, and to societal changes. In Finland the world’s first permanent repository is being hewn out of solid rock—a huge system of underground tunnels—that must last 100,000 years as this is how long the waste remains hazardous.

Captivating, wondrous and extremely frightening, this feature documentary takes viewers on a journey never seen before into the underworld and into the future.

Attendance is free for students and $10 for non-students. Non-students can also bring a donation for the SU Campus Food Bank instead of paying for admission. The food bank prefers donations of meal helpers (Sidekicks/Uncle Ben’s rice), canned pasta/chili, Kraft Dinner, peanut butter, dry pasta, canned veggies and/or beans, canned salmon/tuna, dry soup (Mr. Noodle/Ichiban), cereal, or pasta and tomato sauce.
Please note that the SU Campus Food Bank CANNOT accept Expired Food.

Written & Directed by Michael Madsen

75 min. | 2010
INTO ETERNITY official website

Updated: February 7, 2011 — 12:51 pm

Wednesday, January 26: BHUTTO

BHUTTO
Wednesday, January 26 – 6:00 PM
That Empty Space, MacEwan Student Centre

BHUTTO is the definitive documentary that chronicles the life of one of the most complex and fascinating characters of our time. Hers is an epic tale of Shakespearean dimension. It’s the story of the first woman in history to lead a Muslim nation: Pakistan. Newsweek called it the most dangerous place in the world, and the home of nuclear war heads and the Taliban.
In 2007, with the South Asian country rolling in turmoil and under the thumb of yet another military dictator, Benazir was called back onto the world stage as Pakistan’s best hope for democracy. With her assassination she transcended politics, but left a legacy of simmering controversy and undeniable courage that will be debated for years.

Attendance is free for students and $10 for non-students. Non-students can also bring a donation for the SU Campus Food Bank instead of paying for admission. The food bank prefers donations of meal helpers (Sidekicks/Uncle Ben’s rice), canned pasta/chili, Kraft Dinner, peanut butter, dry pasta, canned veggies and/or beans, canned salmon/tuna, dry soup (Mr. Noodle/Ichiban), cereal, or pasta and tomato sauce.

Please note that the SU Campus Food Bank CANNOT accept Expired Food.

BHUTTO - You Can’t Murder A Legacy

Directed by Duane Baughman & Johnny O’Hara | 111 min. | 2010
BHUTTO official website

Updated: November 29, 2010 — 1:26 pm

Wednesday, November 24: Sons of Perdition

Sons of Perdition
Wednesday, November 24 – 6:00PM
That Empty Space, MacEwan Student Centre

Sons of Perdition follows three boys after they leave the isolation of Colorado City and join an underground network of exiled FLDS teens. Condemned to hell by their community, many of the boys turn to drugs and alcohol. With limited educations and rarely a stable address, the obstacles are enormous. All the boys have big dreams—starting with the hope of attending high school—but what they want most is contact with their families. For one teen in the film, this means numerous attempts to help his fourteen-year-old sister escape before an arranged marriage. With unprecedented access, Sons of Perdition takes audiences on a three-year-journey into the lives of these remarkable teens, providing the inside analysis to make this intimate portrait a big story—a timely, critical look at faith, family and religious exile in mainstream America.

Attendance is free for students and $10 for non-students. Non-students can also bring a donation for the SU Campus Food Bank instead of paying for admission. The food bank prefers donations of meal helpers (Sidekicks/Uncle Ben’s rice), canned pasta/chili, Kraft Dinner, peanut butter, dry pasta, canned veggies and/or beans, canned salmon/tuna, dry soup (Mr. Noodle/Ichiban), cereal, or pasta and tomato sauce.

Please note that the SU Campus Food Bank CANNOT accept Expired Food.

SOP_Sam Sidewalk

Directed by Tyler Measom and Jennilyn Merten 2010
Sons of Perdition official website

Updated: November 3, 2010 — 11:57 am

Wednesday, October 27th: Enemies of the People

Enemies of the People
Wednesday, October 27th – 6:00PM
That Empty Space, MacEwan Student Centre

Directed by Rob Lemkin
2009
enemiesofthepeoplemovie.com


The Khmer Rouge ran what is regarded as one of the twentieth century’s most brutal regimes. Yet the Killing Fields of Cambodia remain unexplained. Until now.

In ENEMIES OF THE PEOPLE the men and women who perpetrated the massacres – from the foot-soldiers who slit throats to the party’s ideological leader, Nuon Chea aka Brother Number Two – break a 30-year silence to give testimony never before heard or seen.

Unprecedented access from top to bottom of the Khmer Rouge has been achieved through a decade of work by one of Cambodia’s best investigative journalists, Thet Sambath.

Sambath is on a personal quest: he lost his own family in the Killing Fields. The film is his journey to discover not how but why they died. In doing so, he hears and understands for the first time the real story of his country’s tragedy.

After years of visits and trust-building, Sambath finally persuades Brother Number Two to admit (again, for the first time) in detail how he and Pol Pot (the two supreme powers in the Khmer Rouge state) decided to kill party members whom they considered ‘Enemies of the People’.

Sambath’s remarkable work goes even one stage further: over the years he befriends a network of killers in the provinces who implemented the kill policy. For the first time, we see how orders created on an abstract political level translate into foul murder in the rice fields and forests of the Cambodian plain.

We have repeatedly used the expression ‘for the first time’. This is because Sambath’s work represents a watershed both in Cambodian historiography and in the country’s quest for closure on one of the world’s darkest episodes.

The United Nations and the Cambodian government have set up a tribunal to try the senior leaders of the Khmer Rouge for international crimes. Brother Number Two’s trial is expected to start in 2010.

The trials are widely expected to deliver a form of justice but fewer expect the truth finally to come out through this process.

Sambath says: “Some may say no good can come from talking to killers and dwelling on past horror, but I say these people have sacrificed a lot to tell the truth. In daring to confess they have done good, perhaps the only good thing left. They and all the killers like them must be part of the process of reconciliation if my country is to move forward.”

Attendance is free for students and $10 for non-students. Non-students can also bring a donation for the SU Campus Food Bank instead of paying for admission. The food bank prefers donations of meal helpers (Sidekicks/Uncle Ben’s rice), canned pasta/chili, Kraft Dinner, peanut butter, dry pasta, canned veggies and/or beans, canned salmon/tuna, dry soup (Mr. Noodle/Ichiban), cereal, or pasta and tomato sauce.

Please note that the SU Campus Food Bank CANNOT accept Expired Food.

Updated: October 14, 2010 — 1:48 pm

Wednesday, September 29th: Life 2.0

Life 2.0
Wednesday, September 29th – 6:00PM
That Empty Space, MacEwan Student Centre

Directed by Jason Spingarn-Koff
2010
www.life2movie.com

Life 2.0 follows a group of people whose lives are dramatically transformed by the virtual world Second Life. They enter a new reality, whose inhabitants assume alternate personas in the form of avatars. The film is foremost an intimate, character-based drama about people who look to a virtual world in search of something they are missing in their real lives. A young woman in Detroit becomes a star designer of virtual clothes and houses; an American and a Canadian fall in love online then struggle to build a real life together; a man creates the avatar of an 11-year-old girl who he believes is an expression of his subconscious.

The results are unexpected and often disturbing: reshaping relationships, identities, and ultimately the very notion of reality.

sxsw-life20

Updated: September 14, 2010 — 1:28 pm

Wednesday, March 31st: Garbage Dreams

Garbage Dreams
Wednesday, March 31st – 6:00PM
That Empty Space, MacEwan Student Centre

Directed by Mai Iskander 2009, 79 minutes
www.garbagedreams.com

Garbage Dreams follows three teenage boys born into the trash trade and growing up in the world’s largest garbage village, on the outskirts of Cairo. It is the home to 60,000 Zaballeen, Arabic for “garbage people.” Far ahead of any modern “Green” initiatives, the Zaballeen survive by recycling 80 percent of the garbage they collect. When their community is suddenly faced with the globalization of its trade, each of the teenage boys is forced to make choices that will impact his future and the survival of his community.

AL GORE, Nobel Peace Prize winner, Academy Award winner and former Vice-President of the United States, says: “‘Garbage Dreams’ is a moving story of young men searching for a ways to eke out a living for their families and facing tough choices as they try to do the right thing for the planet. Mai Iskander, the director, guides us into a ‘garbage village,’ a place so different from our own, and yet the choices they face there are so hauntingly familiar. Ultimately, ‘Garbage Dreams’ makes a compelling case that modernization does not always equal progress.
garbagedreams

Updated: March 5, 2010 — 3:45 pm
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